Black Perigord Truffles
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The Black Périgord Truffle (Tuber melanosporum vitt), also known as a Truffe de Périgord (French).

As you can see, the Black Périgord Truffle is actually more of a grayish/brownish black on the exterior, with a warty, diamond-like skin. The interior Glebe is a chocolate-brown to black color with white spidery veins that indicate maturity of the Truffle. The typical example can weigh up to 3.5 oz (100 g).

Most of the world wide crop (22-50 tons depending on the year) originates in various regions of France (45%), Spain (35%) and Italy, most specifically Umbria (20%). Smaller harvests are brought in by Slovenian, Croatian, British, Appalachian, Canadian, Tasmanian and Australian farmers.

Fresh Black Perigord Truffles are the most desirable form and some gourmands claim that they surpass the famed White Italian Truffle.

Season

The species of Truffle fruits in the late autumn (November 15th) and winter (March 31), hence the Black Winter Truffle name, and reaches the height of its earthy, subtle perfume in Périgeuix in January.

Cultivation

Black Diamonds, the “Queen of Truffles,” a Black Winter Truffle, or sometimes as just a Black Truffle, is often foraged 4 to 5 inches beneath the oak and hazelnut trees near the French town of Perigeaux, about halfway between Bordeaux and Limoges.

Varieties

If true, that is good news for the rest of us, because Black Périgord Truffles don’t command the same prices as the White Italian Truffles, which typically fetch four times as much. In turn, the Black Perigord costs 4 times as much as other black varieties of Truffle, like the Black Burgundy Truffle, the Brumale Truffle or the Summer Black Truffle.

Purchasing

Though they are more expensive, shop for Black Perigord Truffles at a reputable merchant like Urbani to make sure you are getting what you pay for.

Culinary Uses

Black Périgord Truffles have an earthy, chocolate aroma. Unlike White Italian Truffles, Black Périgord Truffles release more aroma when cooked so they are often added to sauces, risottos, eggs, lamb, seafood, sweetbreads, poultry. One of the most famous classic French Truffle dishes is Tournedos Rossini. Another exceptional use is to Truffle a Turkey.

Gluten Free

Yes

Low Fat

Yes

Low Calorie

Yes