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Abrasions are superficial wounds in which the topmost layer of the skin (the epidermis) is scraped off. An Abrasion, is often caused by a sliding fall onto a rough surface. Nutritional Value USDA
Acetic Acid, also known as "ethanoic acid," is a food additive used as a Pickling and Curing agent, flavoring agent, pH control and vehicle in processed foods. Acetic Acid can be commonly found in Salad Dressings and prepared Sauces. Nutritional Value USDA
Amino Acids are chemical components of protein. Amino Acids are essential to the human diet. Nutritional Value USDA
For simpilier kitchen knowledge, an Antioxidant is a enzyme or organic substance, such as Vitamin E or Beta-Carotene. The Antioxidant enzyme, is capable of counteracting the damaging effects of oxidation in meat tissue. Nutritional Value USDA
Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms, that serve many functions. Most bacteria are very useful. Some strains of bacteria are part of our natural digestion others help us produce foods like yogurt, sauerkraut, vinegar and alcoholic beverages. In nature, bacteria also help fix...
Bactericide is an agent, capable of killing one or more species of bacteria. Season Availability Cultivation Production Varieties Purchasing Storage Nutritional Value USDA
Out for a night on the town? Your personal hygiene choices are you’re your own. But in the kitchen, some hygiene choices are just bad. Being clean, neat and washed, cuts down on the risk of transmitting food borne disease. That’s just a fact, not a commentary on anyone’s...
A Biological Hazard (or biohazard): is an organism, or substance derived from an organism, that poses a threat to (primarily) human health. Food borne illness, the term Food Poisoning can be misleading, usually arises from, Bad Hygiene, improper handling, preparation, storage...
Blood Sugar: This refers to the amount of glucose present in the bloodstream. Nutritional Value USDA
Calcium: essential for living organisms, and is the primary chemical component in bone structure. The mineral is also involved in muscle contraction and relaxation, nerve and immune function, blood clotting, and blood pressure. Nutritional Value USDA
Calorie: A unit of measure for the energy value of food. Technically, Calorie refers to a unit of energy, equal to the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1° C. Nutritional Value USDA
Campylobacter is a bacterial pathogen that causes fever, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. It is the most commonly identified bacterial cause of diarrheal illness in the world. Campylobacter live in the intestines of healthy birds. Most Raw Poultry meat has Campylobacter on it. Eating...
The Carbohydrate, is a nutrient and the second most important food group for the human diet. Varieties Carbohydrates are either categorized as sugars or starches. Culinary Uses Carbohydrates are commonly found in cereals, bread and pasta. Sugars are commonly found in dessert, fruits,...
Chemicals can be present in the environment in which food is grown, harvested, transported, stored, packaged, processed and consumed. The physical contact of the food with the chemicals results in its chemical contamination. Varieties Possible sources of contamination...
Cholesterol is the most plentiful form of lipids, known as "sterols". Its necessary for healthy body function but can form deposits in arteries, leaving a high risk of heart disease. Nutritional Value USDA
Clostridium Botulinum causes Botulism, a poisoning (poisoning is also known as Intoxication), caused by exotoxins excreted by the botulinum bacteria under anaerobic conditions. Killing the bacteria requires higher heat than that of even boiling water, where Clostridium Botulinum can...
Clostridium Perfringens is also found in contaminated soil and can be transferred to fresh meat or vegetables, even to human carriers. It causes infection and secretes an exotoxin as the cells grow. Symptoms of the exotoxin poisoning typically appear after 1–6 hours depending on the...
A Complete Protein contains all 9 of the Essential Amino Acids necessary for human health. Some foods contain all the essential amino acids on their own in a sufficient amount to qualify as a "Complete Protein.” The USFDA has a “Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid...
Complex Carbohydrates: built from long chains of glucose molecules, strung together to create polysaccharides. Nutritional Value USDA
Cryptosporidiosis is a diarrheal disease (stomach cramps, diarrhea, fever) caused by microscopic parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium parvum which are so small that 10,000 would fit on the period at the end of this sentence. The first symptoms of crypto may appear 2 to 10 days after a...
A Culture is referred to a group or aggregation of microorganisms, especially bacteria; generally, the culture is intended for commercial or scientific use and is intended for commercial or scientific use and is composed of descendants of a single such microorganism growing in a special...
Dehydration: Excessive loss of body water. Nutritional Value USDA
Diabetes: A condition in which the body does not produce enough, or properly respond to insulin. Nutritional Value USDA
E. Coli (Escherichia coli) has several strains though the one recognized by the production system to be most dangerous is 0157:H7. E. Coli can cause infection and intoxication by an enterotoxin. E. Coli is found in feces, as in the intestinal tract of humans and animals like cattle,...
Sodium Sodium is one of the main electrolytes responsible for maintaining the fluid balance in the body and assisting in muscle contraction. Most diets are high in sodium, causing as increase in blood pressure (hypertension) in salt sensitive individuals. Processed foods and table salt...
Amino Acids are organic compounds made in the body which combine to form proteins.
There many Fatty Acids but only two Essential Fatty Acids, Omega-3 Fatty Acids or Omega-3 Alpha-Linolenic acid (LNA), and Omega 6 Fatty Acids or Omega-6 Linoleic Acid (LA) that our bodies must have but which they cannot synthesize and must get from the environment. For this reason, omega-6s and...
The Fat-Soluble Vitamins are Vitamins A, D, E and K. They are needed to maintain good health. Cooking Foods Containing Them Does Not Damage Them.
Fats and lipids are the third major food category of the macro nutrients needed in human nutrition. Lipids are organic compounds that are insoluble (don’t dissolve) in water. Fats are a specific sub-set of lipids, differentiated by their molecular structure and metabolic functions....
Fatty Acids are the Building Blocks of Fats and can be Saturated or Unsaturated.
Dietary fiber, also known as roughage, is a type of carbohydrate the body can’t digest. There are two forms of fiber: soluble that can dissolve in water, (for example, legumes, oats, rye, prune juice, plums, berries, bananas) and insoluble that can’t dissolve in water, (for...
Food Infections occur in humans because of the presence of harmful bacteria or other microbes which infect the body after consuming contaminated food. Pathogens cause infections and intoxications. Intoxication, is the result of poisons or toxins that enter the system after they...
Food Intoxication refers to the ingestion of noxious toxins contained in the food, including the large variety of chemical toxins that are found in the environment, bacterially produced exo, endo or enterotoxins and naturally occurring toxins (like mushroom toxins or shellfish...
Most food poisonings are actually really Infections caused by a host of Pathogens (bacteria, viruses, prions or parasites) and not poisonings caused by chemical or natural Toxins, resulting in Intoxication. Nutritional Value USDA
Fructose; (also known as "Fruit Sugar"), is a monosaccharide sugar found in many plants and fruits. Fructose, the sweetest of the sugar is, along with galactose and glucose, one of the three dietary simple sugars that are used directly by the body during digestion. The French...
Galactose is a monosaccharide sugar, that is a building block in creating the disaccharide sugar lactose. Galactose, from the Greek stem “galakt” meaning “milk,” is less sweet than glucose (the other simple sugar that is combined with Galactose to form...
Gallbladder: A saclike structure that stores and concentrates the bile secreted by the liver until it is discharged through the bile duct into the duodenum. Portion Size Pairings Substitutes Nutritional Value Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition Gluten Free Low...
Gastointestinal Tract: The portion of the alimentary canal relating to the stomach and intestines. Nutritional Value USDA
Gastroenteritis: Inflammation of the stomach and intestinal tract. Nutritional Value USDA
Glucose; (also known as Dextrose, D-Glucose or Grape Sugar) is a Monosaccharide sugar found in plants. Also, Glucose is the primary product of a plants process of photosynthesis. The name "Glucose" comes from the Greek word “glukus” meaning "sweet". Emil...
Glucosinolates are a type of organic compound that contains both sulfur and nitrogen. Glucosinolates are derived from Glucose and an Amino Acid and are most often found in nature as secondary metabolites in most Greens and Cruciferous Vegetables in the Brassicales and Drypetes families. ...
Goitrogens are foods that tend to encourage the formation of Goiters, or the enlargement of the thyroid gland. We are not doctors or researchers, but as we understand it, these Goitrogenic Foods typically contain sulfur or sulfuric elements and the sulfur, iron and copper in your body...
HDL Cholesterol: Cholesterol packaged in high-density lipoproteins; it transports fats in the blood, and a high level of HDL Cholesterol is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Nutritional Value USDA
Heart Disease: A general term for a variety of negative conditions that affect the heart. Nutritional Value USDA
Heartburn: A burning chest pain caused by the reflux of the stomach's acidic contents into the lower esophagus; often associated with overeating, eating spicy foods, or drinking alcoholic beverages. Nutritional Value USDA
The Hepatitis (A,B,C,D & E) viruses produce an infection in humans who ingest it. The word "hepatitis" means inflammation of the liver and these hepatitis viruses affect the liver. Common ways to come in contact with Hepatitis in food include: eating raw shellfish from...
The Digestive Process The process of digestion makes the essential nutrients available to our bodies. The digestive system begins in your mouth where the tongue and teeth work together to break up the food. Your salivary glands produce saliva; a substance composed of water, mucus,...
Lowering Salt Intake The recommended amount of sodium intake per day is 2,325 mg, or 1 tsp, per day. However, most people go far above and beyond this in their daily eating habits. These habits, couple with foods high in fat content, have led to many health problems in the world. While...
Ileum: The last portion of the small intestine, extending from the jejunum to the cecum, and the principal site of a nutrient absorption. Nutritional Value USDA
Incomplete Proteins describe a food that contains some protein but doesn't contain all of the Essential Amino Acids. While it contains some, it does not contain all of them. Incomplete Proteins can be combined to provide all the essential amino acids and form a Complete Protein....
Insulin: A hormone that affects metabolism and many other body functions. Nutritional Value USDA
Iodine: A chemical element that has the symbol I and atomic number 53. It is used as a disinfectant in many forms. Nutritional Value USDA
Iron: An element essential to nearly all known living organisms. Iron catalyses production of toxic free radicals. Nutritional Value USDA
Jejunum: The middle portion of small intestine, extending from the duodenum to the Ileum. Nutritional Value USDA
Keratin: An extremely tough and water-insoluble protein found in hair, nails and horny tissues. Nutritional Value USDA
Ketosis: The undesirable accumulation of ketones in the body; this increases the body's acidity, which causes headaches, nausea, fatigue and dizziness and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease; it can be fatal; ketosis is often the result of ketogenic or starvation...
Kidney: An organ that filters blood to remove waste material and forwards it to the bladder for excretion. .2. A variety meat; generally small with a reddish-brown color, a tender texture, and a strong flavor; beef and veal kidneys are multi-lobed; lamb and pork kidneys are single...
Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition L-Carnitine- is a "free form" amino acid which is a major source of fuel for muscles and helps build them. It also increases the use of fat as an energy source, thus reducing fatty buildup in the heart, liver, and skeletal muscles; strengthens the...
Lacerations: Irregular tear-like wounds, caused by some blunt trauma. Nutritional Value USDA
Lactase: An intestine enzyme that breaks down lactose into Monosaccharides during digestion. Nutritional Value USDA
Lactobacillus Acidophilus: A bacteria found in some Yogurts that may assist lactose digestion. Nutritional Value USDA
Lactose, also known as "Milk Sugar," is a bland, un-sweet disaccharide sugar made of a combination of galactose and glucose that is found in milk or milk products. In fact, milk is 2% to 8% Lactose, by weight. The amount of Lactose in different types of milk varies and Lactose...
Listeria is a bacteria found in unpasteurized milk, smoked fish, soft cheeses (made with unpasteurized milk), raw meat, deli meats, hot dogs or sausages that are not fully heated (even pre-cooked ones), and unwashed vegetables. Listeria can make humans very ill with Listeriosis if...
Macrobiotic: A diet that allows the consumption of fish and unprocessed vegan foods. Nutritional Value USDA
Maltose (also known as Maltobiose or Malt Sugar) is a Disaccharide Sugar made by combining two Glucose Sugars. Maltose is the Disaccharide Sugar that is produced when Amylose breaks down Starch. In humans, Maltose is broken down by the enzyme Maltase. Maltose is less sweet than Glucose,...
Metabolism is the set of chemical reactions in living organisms, to maintain life. Nutritional Value USDA
Microorganism: Any organism too small to be seen. An example would be Bacteria or Fungi. Nutritional Value USDA
DNA evidence from the Neolithic skeletons confirms that Humans were not originally engineered, to consume foreign animal Lactose. Scientists call this lactase-persistence, or the ability to continue to continue digesting Milk after Infancy, when the lactase gene in most mammals turns...
Milk Solids are the Proteins, milk sugar (lactose) and minerals (but not the milk fat) present in Milk. Culinary Uses Milk Solids burn easily and are the reason that Whole Butter has a Smoke Point of between 300°F-350°F (149°C-177°C), while Clarified Butter (with the...
Dietary minerals are the chemical elements essential to nutrition. Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition Since our bodies cannot manufacture minerals on their own, we are dependent on a healthy and balanced diet in order to maintain good mineral balance. Minerals are composed of two...
Monosaccharides simply mean “Single Sugars” where the Sugar is made from a single Suguar molecule. Glucose, Fructose and Galactose are all simple sugars and Monosaccharides. Other Sugars are made up of combinations of Sugar molecules and are called Disaccharides. Lactose,...
Monounsaturated Fat, an unsaturated fat, usually comes from seeds or Nuts such as Avocados, Olives, Peanuts, and Canola Oils. Monounsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature. Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition Mayo Clinic believes that Monounsaturated Fats are (along with...
Myoglobin is reactive with Oxygen where exposure to Oxygen gradually changes the Myoglobin to Metmyoglobin. When Purchasing Beef, the change in color of red meat from red to grey is due to the reaction of Myoglobin with Oxygen. Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition Myoglobin is a red,...
Natural Vitamins: Vitamin supplements that contain vitamin extracts from food and are not completely synthetic. Nutritional Value USDA
According to the USDA, the term "no antibiotics added" may be used on labels for meat or poultry products if sufficient documentation is provided by the producer to the Agency demonstrating that the animals were raised without antibiotics, or were antibiotic free well before...
Noroviruses ( Norovirus, Caliciviridae) are a group of related, single-stranded RNA, viruses that cause acute gastroenteritis in humans. The most common symptoms of a Norovirus infection are diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach pain. Noroviruses caused 57% of viral food borne illness outbreaks...
Obese: Having an excessively abnormal amount of fat on the body (generally, being 20% or more above the appropriate weight for height). Nutritional Value USDA
Oils are composed primarily of fats, which makes them nature’s lubricants. Varieties The perfect oil (or fat) should be proportionally higher in Monounsaturated Fat and Polyunsaturated Fat, with moderate amounts of, or no, Saturated Fat & Trans Fatty Acid. Nutritional...
Oleic Acid: A Monounsaturated Fatty Acid that is one of the principal fatty acids present in foods. Nutritional Value USDA
Olestra: A molecularly restructured fat (a Sucrose polyester) that passes through the human body without being absorbed, thus adding no Calories or Cholesterol to the food in which it is used; available for use only in commercial food processing. Nutritional Value USDA
Omega-3 Alpha-Linolenic acid (LNA) or Omega-3 fatty acids are a so called “Essential” fatty acid that our bodies need but cannot synthesize. Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition To get them you have to eat them. Omega-3 fatty acids are use by the body in our eyes, hair,...
Hens that lay omega-3-enriched Eggs are fed a special diet including lots of flaxseed, which is about 55% ALA (alpha-linolenic acid), one of the three omega-3 acids research has shown to have cardiovascular benefits. Free-range chickens that eat grasses and bugs also tend to lay eggs with...
Omega-6 Linoleic Acid (LA) or Omega-6 fatty acids are a so called “Essential” fatty acid that our bodies need but cannot synthesize from other nutrients. Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition To get them you have to eat them. Omega-6 fatty acids play a crucial role in brain...
Oxalic Acid is a dicarboxylic acid which is a colorless, crystalline, organic compound that dissolves in water making a colorless Solution. Oxalic Acid is a reducing agent and the base for Oxalates. Calcium Oxalate is the most common element in Kidney Stones. Ingestion of Oxalic Acid,...
Culinary Uses One of the most important uses of Papain in culinary practice is for Tenderizing. Papain is also extracted and used as a digestive enzyme dietary supplement and in some chewing gums. Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition Papain is an enzyme that helps break down Proteins....
Food borne parasites inhabit the intestines of their host. Undercooked Meat and infected water are the best ways to pick up a parasite. Varieties The mucous plaque buildup in the human intestine provides an excellent breeding ground for these parasites which include...
Pathogens are known biological disease agents that cause Infections and Intoxications. Pathogens may not be detectable through odor, taste or appearance. The best ways to combat Pathogens are to purchase food from good sources, practice good hygiene (by washing hands after visiting the...
Pectin is a complex carbohydrate (heteropolysaccharide), which is found both in, and between, the cell walls of plants. Pectin is a gelling agent that helps regulate the flow of water in between cells and keeps them rigid. Plant products like fruits, lose Pectin as they age. You may have...
Pescatarian: A person that still consumes fish meat. Nutritional Value USDA
If you have pets and they have fleas you may increase your risk of contracting a tapeworm. Flea larva eat tapeworm problottids. Pets eat the fleas pestering them and can become infected by tapeworms. If Fido or Garfield has the “scoots,” worms in their stool or throws up from...
Food Can Be at Risk from Items that Come in Contact with it and Adulterate it.
Varieties Polyphenols are naturally occurring in many fruits and vegetables (including Berries, Apples, Cherries, Grapes, Pears, Plums, Broccoli, Onions, Parsley, Cabbage) as well as in Honey, Green Tea, Olive Oil, Chocolate, Red Wine, and certain Grains. Nutritional Value...
Varieties Polyunsaturated Fat is an unsaturated fat that usually comes from vegetables, seeds, or nuts such as corn, safflower, sunflower, soybean, cottonseed, and sesame seeds. Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition These fats are liquid at room temperature. Mayo Clinic believes that...
Processed Food: A labeling term approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Processed Food, that is intended to substitute for another food and is nutritionally altered to the food being imitated. Culinary Uses Although it may have fewer essential nutrients and often...
Proteins are one of the three major food categories (proteins, carbohydrates, fat). Varieties Proteins sources include: Meat, Fish, Eggs, Milk and Legumes. Culinary Uses Smart Kitchen discusses Proteins in detail in Lesson 7: Protein Basics. Nutritional Value...
Ratchet Effect: The vicious cycle of weight loss with subsequent rebound to a higher weight; also known as the yo-yo effect and yo-yo dieting. Nutritional Value USDA
Raw Vegan: One that doesn't eat any food produced (in any way) by animals and does not cook food. Nutritional Value USDA
Riboflavin: Also known as vitamin B2 and is essential for maintaining skin and mucous membranes. Nutritional Value USDA
Rotavirus is one of several viruses that cause infections described as “Stomach Flu” (despite being unrelated to influenza) and is the most common cause of severe diarrhea among infants and young children. By five years of age, nearly every child in the world has contracted...
Consuming Salmonella (salmonella enteritides) causes infections in humans. Salmonella is found most frequently today in contaminated Poultry, Poultry Products, Poultry Stuffings, inadequately cooked Eggs, Gravies, Raw Food, Shellfish from contaminated waters & Meat. How to...
Saturated Fats are Solid at Body Temperature and Room Temperature which Causes Them to be Heart Un-Healthy.
Shigella is a family of bacteria that can cause Shigellosis which leads to sudden and severe diarrhea (gastroenteritis) in humans. Shigellosis is also known as bacillary dysentery and can occur after consuming fewer than 100 bacteria according to the American Public Health Association....
Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition Simple Carbohydrates: A Carbohydrate, as Glucose, that consists of a single Monosaccharide unit. Gluten Free Yes Low Fat Varies Low Calorie Varies
Small Intestine: Divided into three sections (the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum), the wall is lined with minute fingerlike projections (called villi) through which the products of digestion, such as Monosaccharides, Fatty Acids and Amino Acids, are absorbed into the...
Soluble Fiber: also known as Pectin, this will dissolve in water and swell into a gel. Nutritional Value USDA Gluten Free Yes Low Fat Yes Low Calorie Yes
Staphylococcus (Staphylococcus Aureus) produces exotoxins which cause Intoxication that leads to intense vomiting. The exotoxins remain and can produce illness even when the bacteria that produced them have been killed. Symptoms of the intoxication typically appear 1–6 hours after...
Starch is the Primary Carbohydrates in Plants and in the Human Diet.
Streptococcus or “Strep” cause an infection. It is typically acquired from food handlers’ coughs or sneezes contaminating food that is then served without further cooking. The method of human transmission makes it hard to pinpoint specific foods that are most...
Sucrose is an organic compound with a naturally Sweet taste. “Sucrose” (sometimes called “saccharose”) comes from the Latin word for Sugar (“Sucrum”) and is an organic, white, odorless, crystalline powder that we typically call Table Sugar, Refined...
Tapeworms (Taenia Solium) are long, segmented, parasitic worms that live in the intestines of some animal and require a host to reach sexual maturity. About 8 species use human hosts, with Taenia Solium being the most common one. Tapeworms can live in mice, humans, whales and everything in...
Meat consumption is a hot topic these days. We need protein for our bodies but a diet high in meat can contribute to increased risk for health problems such as high cholesterol and gout, as well as straining our kidneys, which process our protein consumption. The amount of protein we need...
Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition In the 1960’s, it was discovered that 100 g (3.5 oz) of boneless, skinless White Chicken Meat was 15% higher in Protein (23 g to 20 g), slightly lower in Calories (114 to 125), and a bit lower in Fat (0.44 g to 1.1 g) than Dark Chicken Meat. All meat...
Applied Heat Can Be Applied to Kill Pathogens.
There are pesticide residues in many of the fruits and vegetables grown in the traditional system. For most of us, traditional, commercial produce is what we find at retail. The raw data was collected by United States Department of Agriculture personnel, who mimicked consumer behavior by washing...
There are pesticide residues in many of the fruits and vegetables grown in the traditional system. For most of us, traditional, commercial produce is what we find at retail. The raw data was collected by United States Department of Agriculture personnel, who mimicked consumer behavior by washing...
Pathogens Can Also Be Killed By Safe Chemical Means.
Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition Thiamine is a B vitamin, that is part of a co-enzyme used in energy metabolism.
Considered by Most Nutritionists to be the Worst of the Fats.
Trichinosis is a parasitic disease caused by eating raw or undercooked pork, beef or wild game infected with the larvae of a species of roundworm (Trichinella spiralis), commonly known as the trichina worm. Only three of the eight Trichinella species are known to cause trichinosis: T....
Tyrosine: An amino acid most nutritionists consider essential; used to form the nerve tissue chemical epinephrine, melanin skin pigment and a thyroid hormone. 2. A food additive used as a nutrient source to significantly improve the biological quality of the total protein in a food...
Unsaturated Fats are the Healthier Fats.
Vinegar is very useful in cleaning and medicine. Hippocrates, (referred to as the father of medicine), extolled the healing properties of vinegar. Vinegar is an acid with a low pH. So it kills many germs and viruses. Michael Mullen, a spokesperson for the Heinz corporation, says that...
Valine: An Essential Amino Acid important for normal growth in children and nitrogen balance in adults. 2. A food additive used as a nutrient source to significantly improve the biological quality of the total protein in a food containing the naturally occurring Protein. Nutritional...
Viruses cause about a third of the cases of food borne illness in the developed world. In the U.S., they cause more than 50% of food borne illness cases. Varieties The most prevalent food borne virus is Norovirus. Food borne viral infections usually have an intermediate (1-3 days)...
Vitamin A, a Fat Soluble Vitamin, also called retinol, has many functions in the body. In addition to helping the eyes adjust to light changes, Vitamin A plays an important role in bone growth, tooth development, reproduction, cell division and gene expression. Also, the skin, eyes and...
Vitamin C, also known as "ascorbic acid," is a water-soluble vitamin. Vitamin C can be found in citrus, fresh fruits, cabbage-type vegetables, dark green vegetables, and potatoes. This vitamin is involved in collagen synthesis, iron absorption, amino acid metabolism, and wound...
Vitamin D, a Fat Soluble Vitamin, has a critical role in the body’s use of calcium and phosphorous, increasing the amount of calcium absorbed from the small intestine and helping form and maintain bones. Vitamin D is especially important for children who need adequate amounts to...
Vitamin E acts as an antioxidant, protecting vitamins A and C, red blood cells and essential fatty acids from destruction. Research from a decade ago suggested that taking antioxidant supplements, Vitamin E in particular, might help prevent heart disease and cancer. However, newer findings...
Vitamin K is a Fat Soluble Vitamin, that is naturally produced by bacteria (the good flora) in the intestines. Vitamin K plays an essential role in normal blood clotting and helps promote bone health. Anderson & Young’s article has charts detailing the recommended daily...
A vitamin is an organic compound needed by the body to develop normally and grow. Although essential fatty acids, minerals, and amino acids are all also essential for good health, they are not considered to be vitamins. Varieties There are 13 recognized vitamins including A, C, D,...
Waist To Hip Ratio: A measurement of the distribution of body fat; a high ratio reflects the excess accumulation of fat above the waist, which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes and other disorders. Nutritional Value USDA
Water is a primal compound of life made of one hydrogen atom and two oxygen atoms. Humans are made of up to 70% water. Many of the foods we eat are made of significant amounts of water. Water enables many cooking methods and is a good choice for a transport medium to convey flavors and...
Water Hardness is classified based on the amounts of removable calcium carbonate salt it contains per gallon. Water Hardness also affects pH balance and plays a vital role in sanitation. When water is hard, it means that it is generally contaminated with many types of minerals soil,...
There are a variety of Fruits & Vegetables that are waxed, naturally or by man, to help prolong their freshness.
Whey: Liquid part of Milk Proteins. Nutritional Value USDA Gluten Free Yes Low Fat No Low Calorie No
Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition Zinc: A trace material principally used as an enzyme and hormone component and to assist protein development, building of genetic materials, functioning of the immune system and taste perception; significant sources include Meat, Liver, Poultry, Eggs, Fish and...