Cranberries
Resources > Food > Fruit > Berries > Cranberries

Are you a Smart Kitchen™ Chef?

Try it FREE or take a TOUR to explore Smart Kitchen!
+ -

 

Cranberries are native to North America, and flourished in New England long before the Mayflower arrived. The cranberry was first named "craneberry" by the Pilgrims because the cute pink blossoms resembled the Sandhill crane. Native Americans used the berries for medicinal purposes, as a dye, and for food.

Cranberries have an extremely tart flavor, and are rarely eaten Raw.

Season

Cranberries season fall in the Winter months.

Availability

Cranberries are available year round.

Cultivation

Production

Varieties

Purchasing

When purchasing fresh whole Cranberries, look for Cranberries that are plump, shiny, red, and firm to the touch.

Storage

Store fresh whole Cranberries unwashed in the refrigerator. With most Berries, when stored with any surrounding moisture increases the decaying process dramatically.

Fresh Cranberries will last 2-4 weeks refrigerated and approximetly 1 year frozen.

Culinary Uses

Portion Size

Pairings

Substitutes

Nutritional Value

Nutritional Value USDA
CRANBERRIES,RAW
Amount Per 100g
Calories 46
%Daily Value*
 
0%
Total Fat 0g
0%
Saturated Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
0%
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 2mg
1%
Potassium 85mg
4%
Total Carbohydrate 12g
16%
Dietary Fiber 4g
Sugars 4g
Protein 0g
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Nutrition

One-half cup of fresh cranberries offers ten percent of the recommended daily allowance for vitamin C and contain only 25 calories. Cranberries are also high in Pectin and can be used as a natural Thickener

Gluten Free

Yes

Low Fat

Yes

Low Calorie

Yes