Learn Classic French Sauces
Resources > Cooking Tips > Learn Classic French Sauces

Are you a Smart Kitchen™ Chef?

Try it FREE or take a TOUR to explore Smart Kitchen!
+ -

 

We often think of the classic French sauces, as “Fancy” or “Fattening” and forget that they are still around in the best chefs’ repetoires, hundreds of years later, because they are also extremely strong (tasty) complements to foods.

The first step towards incorporating the classics into your personal repetoire and bringingfine dining flavors to your friends and family, is to become familiar with the names (& pronunciation), ingredients, process, and common uses for some of the greats. Scroll through the list of classics sauces to start building some familiarity with these decorated old campaigners.

Varieties

The list is long. You can follow any of these links to look up any of these sauces.

à ľail

Albert

Albuféra

Alcide

Alexandra

Algérienne

Allemande

Alliance

Ancienne

Antin/ďAntin

Archiduc

Arlesienne

Aurora

Avignonnaise

Banquière

Bavaroise

Béarnaise

Beauharnaise Béchamel

Berchoux Bercy

Bigarade

Bordeaux or Bordelaise

Bourguignonne or Burgundy

Bretonne

Broglie

Camerani

Cardinale

Carignan

Catalane

Cavalière

Champagne or Au Champagne

Chantilly

Charcutière

Châteaubriand

Chivry

Charon

Colbert

Cussy

Diable 

Dieppoise

Duxelles or à la Duxelles

Ecossaise

Espagnole

Estragon or à ľEstragon

Fermière

Financière

Finnoise

Française

François I

Gascogne

Gourmet

Gribiche

Havre

Henri IV

Hollandaise

Holstein

Hongroise

Italienne

Ivoire

Lavaliere

Lyonnaise

Madère

Maillot

Maltaise

Marchand de Vin

Maréchal

Marigny

Marquise

Médici 

Melba

Mignonette

Milanaise

Moelle

Montigny

Mornay

Mousseline

Nantua

Normande

Orléans

Parisienne

Périgord

Périgueux

Piémontaise or à la Piémontaise

Piquante

Poivrade

Pompadour

Portugaise

Poulette

Printanière

Provençale

Ravigote

Reforme or Reform

Régence or Regency

Richelieu

Robert

Romaineà la Romaine or Roman

Rouennaise

Russe

Mère or Sauce Mère

Sévillane

Sicilienne

Soubise

Souchet

Suprême 

Tallyrand

Toulousaine

Truffles or Aux Truffles

Tyrolienne

Velouté

Vierge

Villeroi 

Do you notice how similar some of the preparations are? Often the addition of one ingredient changes the sauce’s, name, and the diner’s experience. It may seem complicated now but don’t worry; over time and with practice, creating these fine-dining sauces will become as easy as pronouncing them will be.

Through the links above and in the Smart Kitchen Intermediate & Advanced Sauce Sections you will see still many more possibilities for creating derivative sauces. With the techniques learned and your imagination there will be more options still as you cook and experiment. If you are the studying type, you may find the books “Sauces” by James Peterson & “The Saucier’s Apprentice” by Raymond Sokolov informative.

Low Fat

Varies

Low Calorie

Varies