E
Resources > Term > E

Are you a Smart Kitchen™ Chef?

Try it FREE or take a TOUR to explore Smart Kitchen!
Enter a keyword or ingredient and Smart Kitchen will display all appropriate resources.
Search within:
Resources > Term > E
The Sandwich is reported to have been created by John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, (3 November 1718 – 30 April 1792) who was a British statesman (often criticized) who held various military and political offices, including Postmaster General, First Lord of the Admiralty and...
Early Potatoes Mature Earlier in the Growing Season.
Earthy: 1. A cheese tasting term for a hearty, assertive, rustic flavor and/or aroma of a cheese, usually a monastery cheese or one made from ewe's or goats milk; an excessively earthy flavor can be undesirable. 2. A coffee tasting term used to describe a somewhat spicy flavor...
Easily Cleanable: In the food safety context, any utensil or piece of equipment that is readily accessible and of such material and design that residue can be removed completely by normal cleaning methods.
Eastern Carrots, also called “Asian” Carrots, are one of the two main types of Carrots grown in the world today. As the name implies, Eastern Carrots are grown mostly in Russia, Asian and Middle Eastern countries. Modern Eastern/Asian Carrots are descended from the original,...
Culinary Uses Edible Flowers are generally used as: 1. An ingredient (such as the Squash Blossom). 2. Flavoring (such as how we use Pansy Flowers, Nasturtium Flowers, Viola Flowers, Rose Flowers and Chive Blossoms). 3. Edible Garnish (such as how we use Borage Flowers, Lovage...
Effervescence: Small bubbles released in a liquid, creating a sparkling sensation on the plate.
Egg-and-Bread-Crumb: A method of dipping food into beaten egg and then into bread crumbs before Frying it to give it a crisp Coating.
Egg Cook: Slang for a food service facility's breakfast cook.
The egg shell is composed of calcium carbonate, which is paradoxically both strong and brittle. It is strong enough to withstand the mother hen sitting on it, yet it is very easy to break open. The shell is also very porous, allowing moisture to escape and odors & flavors to be...
The “Size” written on a carton of a dozen Eggs does not refer to the dimensions of an Egg or how big any of them look. Instead the size label, refers to the minimum required net weight per dozen Eggs. Varieties While some Eggs in the carton may look slightly larger or...
Egg Substitute: A liquid product usually made of Egg White, Food Starch, Corn Oil, Skim Milk Powder, artificial coloring and other additives; it does not contain Cholesterol and is generally used like real Eggs.
An Egg Wash is literally just whisked eggs, used to bathe (wash) another food item. Season Availability Cultivation Production Varieties Purchasing Storage Culinary Uses Egg Washes are generally used as a coating for cooked foods, think french or...
Elastin is a protein that is found in connective tissue that is, as its name implies, elastic. Elastin allows many tissues in the body to resume their shape after stretching or contracting. Elastin is not a desirable protein in meat or foods because it will not break down under...
Ellagitannins are Polyphenols that are formed when ellagic acid binds with a carbohydrate. Ellagitannins are tannins which are thought to have free-radical scavenging properties. Research is ongoing.
Emince: Classical French term for foods served minced or very small diced. Nutritional Value USDA
Emulsified Vinaigrette: A dressing consisting of oil, vinegar, seasonings and an emulsifier such as eggs or mustard. Nutritional Value USDA
Emulsify: To combine two liquids that do not combine well, such as vinegar and oil. One liquid is actually suspended in the other, and they are held together by an emulsifier. Nutritional Value USDA
An Emulsion, is a mixture of two or more naturally immiscible (unblendable) liquids. Nutritional Value USDA
En Papillote (“in paper” in French) is a moist heat cooking method, where foods and seasonings are cooked together inside an envelope made of parchment paper (aluminum foil can also be used). The En Papillote is then sealed before cooking. The seal creates an airtight...
The Endosperm is grain tissue that occurs inside the seed of most flowering kinds of plants as they are fertilized. The Endosperm cocoons the plant embryo and provides it with starch nutrition and can also include oils and proteins. Sounds nutritious, right? It is. The endosperm can be...
An Entrecote can sometimes also be known as a Beauty Steak.
Enzymatic Browning is a chemical process that creates melanins, which result in the browning of food. Oxidation, of an apple for example, causes browning (Enzymatic Browning) as the sugars in the apple break down (lose electrons) after exposure to air (which contains oxygen). In a few...
EP - Stands for "Edible Portion." Nutritional Value USDA
EP Cost: The price of the edible portion of a recipe. Nutritional Value USDA
EP Quantity: The quantity of the edible portion of a recipe. Nutritional Value USDA
Epicarp: The outer part or skin of a fleshy fruit of the genus Prunus.
Ergogenic: To increase work; a food-labeling term (not approved by the FDA) intended to suggest that the particular food or supplement provides energy.
Escoffier: The father of classical cuisine. Widely considered to be the greatest chef of all time, he revolutionized cooking and developed the first a la carte menu. Nutritional Value USDA
Ethylene Gas is a naturally occurring hormone in gaseous form, that triggers ripening in fruit. Almost all fruits give off ethylene gas, but apples, plums, melons and pears give off the most. The riper the fruit, the higher the ethylene gas production, quickening the cycle. Nutritional...
Evaporation: This process is responsible for the drying of foods during cooking. It occurs when the water or moisture turns to vapor and dissipates during the cooking process. Nutritional Value USDA
Executive Chef: The person that is in charge of all things related to the kitchen. Nutritional Value USDA
Exotics: So called because they grow in faraway places, but with improved transportation they are now readily available. Varieties Some example are figs, dates, star fruit, lychee, and tamanillo. Nutritional Value USDA
In addition to its meat grading system, The United State’s Department of Agriculture (USDA) classifies meat based on the percentage of lean content contained in the package. Nutritional Value USDA Nutrition The maximum fat content, by weight, in “Extra Lean” meat...
Extra Rare (“Bleu” in French) refers to meats (primarily beef - lamb - fish) barely cooked, where they are cold and red throughout. They are more of a risk to eat but will be soft, flavorful and tender (depending on your cut). The FDA does not recommend consuming Extra Rare...
Extra Virgin Oil: Oil of the finest quality, oil that is obtained after the first pressing. Nutritional Value USDA