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Resources > Term > G
Galantine: A forcemeat of poultry, game, fish, shellfish, or suckling pig, wrapped in a the skin of the bird or animal, if available, and Poached in an appropriate Stock; usually served cold in Aspic.
Gallisation: The addition of water and/or pure dried sugar, liquid sugar or invert sugar syrup to the grape juice or wine before fermentation to adjust the acid level.
Gallon: A unit of measurement used in cooking to measure volume that is equal to 128 fluid ounces (fl oz). When reading a recipe, Gallon can be abbreviated as "gal". Nutritional Value USDA
Gamy: A tasting term for a food with a penetrating, musky aroma.
Garbage Disposal: An electrical device, usually installed in a sink, with rotating blades that grind foods into very small particles that are then washed down the drain.
Garde Manger; is a french term meaning "keeper of the food," this person is in charge of preparing and presenting cold foods. Nutritional Value USDA
Garde-Manger Section: One of the principal work sections of a food services facility; it typically contains a salad station, cold foods station, sandwich station and charcuterie station.
Garnish is used in food as an attractive decoration. 2. A subsidiary food used to add flavor or character to the main ingredient in a dish. Culinary Uses If a Garnish is used in the second sense, as an enhancement, it can be used on the side, on top of, or in a dish or Sauce. If you...
Gastrique: A sauce made from caramelized sugar deglazed with vinegar and sometimes fruit. A Gastrique, is often used to balance the acidity of fruit or tomato sauces. Nutritional Value USDA
Geese: There are two classes of geese and they are, young and old. Males are called ganders. Nutritional Value USDA
Gelatin (or gelatine) is derived from animal proteins and is the most well known irreversible “hydrocolloid,” ingredients that can capture food as a flexible solid. Others hydrocolloids include Pectin (made from fruit), Agar-agar, (which comes from seaweed), and jelling agents...
Gelatinization in cooking refers to the gelatinization of starch in which starch granules swell when heated in the presence of water. Prolonged heat and stirring (or pressure such as in making popcorn) is necessary to completely dissolve the starch granules. This process can be applied...
Gelatinize: Starches do this as they absorb water and swell, when heat is applied. Nutritional Value USDA
Generic: A class or group of products with predominating common characteristics such as usage, origin, principal ingredients and so on.
Genetically Modified Organisms: Foods that are first produced in a laboratory by inserting specific genes into a plant or animal. The Genetetically Modified Organism gene is added because of a quality, such as resistance to disease or better nutritional value that should make the food...
The germ of a cereal grain is the embryo that grows into a new plant.
A Glace is a reduction of a fully developed (vented) stock. Once reduced to a Glace, the volume of liquid is about 1/10 of the initial volume of the original amount of stock. When warm, the Glace has the consistency of liquid soap. When cold, the Glace is thick and hard like rubber....
To Glaze is to Coat.
Glebe or Gleba is the name for the interior or the flesh of a Truffle. It has texture and can be veiny. The exterior, warty skin of Black Truffles is called the Peridio. White Italian Truffles do not have a Peridio.
Good Milk: milk used to make cheese that is not overheated and does not have a cooked or bad milk taste. Nutritional Value USDA
Grade A Eggs: The medium grade eggs. Culinary Uses These are best for hard cooking. Nutritional Value USDA
Poultry Grading is a voluntary, fee-based system whereby poultry producers can have their product graded by a Federal Inspector. Grade A Poultry is the highest quality and will be nicely shaped, plump, un-bruised, de-feathered, have a nice, fatty skin, be free of broken or disjointed bones...
Grade AA Eggs: The highest grade eggs. Culinary Uses These are best suited for Pan Frying because of their superior appearance. Nutritional Value USDA
Grade B Eggs: These eggs are the lowest grade. Culinary Uses Grade B Eggs are best for Scrambling. Nutritional Value USDA
Grade B Poultry are less meaty and less well finished. Grade B Chicken is not frequently seen in the butcher or grocer’s meat case. Poultry Grading is a voluntary, fee-based system whereby poultry producers can have their product graded by a Federal Inspector. Grade B Poultry is...
Grade C Poultry are the least meaty and least good looking grade of poultry. Grade C Chicken is not frequently seen in the butcher or grocer’s meat case. Poultry Grading is a voluntary, fee-based system whereby poultry producers can have their product graded by a Federal...
The Grades of Beef are: Beef Prime Beef Choice Beef Canner Nutritional Value USDA
All Poultry in the U.S. is mandatorily inspected by the U.S.D.A. for “Wholesomeness,” basically to confirm that is it disease-free and healthy to consume. Chickens are graded by the composition of their skin, skin color (white or yellow), breast size, leg size (short...
Gram: A unit of measurement used in cooking to measure dry ingredients. There are 28.34 grams in 1 ounce and 1,000 grams in a kilogram. Substitutes Can be abbreviated as g. Nutritional Value USDA
Granola: A mixture of grains, seeds, and nuts that has been toasted and mixed with dried fruit. Nutritional Value USDA
What is old becomes new again. Grass Fed Beef is a good example. Though high quality Grass Fed beef is having a renaissance, corn feeding is actually the newer method and in the past it was forage (grass) that fattened cattle. In the 1800’s, in America, beef was one way to monetize the...
Gratiné, also known as Gratinée, Gratin, or Au Gratin refers to a recipe or dish that is topped with Breadcrumbs and Cheese and then Baked or finished under a Broiler or Salamander to form a golden, cheesy crust. The word “Gratin” comes to English from the...
Making Gravy most likely began as a way of extending foods to avoid waste and to harvest extra calories, while adding a covering flavor to sometimes questionable meats. Generally, to make Gravy, excess fat and grease is removed from a pan of cooking meat and the remaining juice is...
Gravy Browning, is the process of gravy salt dissolving in water. It's main use is to color and flavor gravy. Nutritional Value USDA
Gravy Salt is a simple mixture of Salt and Caramel Food Coloring that is used to flavor Gravy. Gluten Free Yes Low Fat Yes Low Calorie Yes
Grease: To rub fat or a fat substitute on the surface of a cooking utensil or item of cookware.
Green Garlic is not a mysterious variant of the familiar Garlic we use every day. Instead, Green Garlic refers to all of the new, green parts of the young Garlic plant. In the United States we are focused on the Garlic Bulb but many other cultures, particularly Asian cultures, use all...
Green Vegetables or “Greens” is a term that is bandied about the kitchen to mean various green colored vegetables or green parts of green vegetables; but what does “Greens” actually mean? According to one dictionary Greens are “any of various leafy...
Gremolata, also spelled “gremolada” is an Italian chopped herb condiment that traditionally accompanies Osso Buco alla Millanese though it is also delicious accompanying or sprinkled over Grilled or Roasted Meat, Poultry and Seafood. Culinary Uses Gremolata is most often...
Griddling is most often used for more delicate foods like fish or more liquid foods like a Pancake Batter. If you want the high direct heat of a grill, but are worried that your product might fall through the grate, griddling might be the right choice. When using a Griddle, make sure the...
Griller: The cook that deals with grilled meats, such as burgers and steaks. Nutritional Value USDA
In the kitchen, Grilling is a medium-high heat cooking method. Grilling, is used over an open grid or flame for cooking food. Season Availability Cultivation Production Varieties Purchasing Storage Culinary Uses Portion...
In meat, Gristle refers to tough, inedible cartilage. Gristle is found in Beef, Pork, Chicken and other Meats.
Grits: A corn-based food, that is a staple in the southern United States. Some types of Grits are: Instant Grits Quick Cooking Grits Regular Grits Stone Ground Grits Nutritional Value USDA
Groats is a term that refers to Grains (such as Oats, Wheat, Barley, Rye, etc.) where the Hull has been removed. With the outer hull removed, Groats contain only the Germ, Endosperm and Bran of the Grain. Culinary Uses Groats can also be produced from Pseudo-Cereals. Groats are most...
Ground Poultry is a catch-all that covers all the types of domesticated Poultry commonly found in ground form at retail. There are no specific Federal rules governing Ground Poultry as far as percentages of White Meat or Dark Meat, type of Poultry Primal Cuts (Breast, Legs, Wings,...
Ground Poultry Meat is a catch-all that covers all of the types of domesticated Poultry meat commonly found in ground form at retail. The rules for Ground Poultry Meat apply to each specific type of avian, which is commonly designated as Ground Chicken, Ground Turkey, etc. Ground Poultry...
Culinary Uses An extract of the guar bean, guar gum is used to Thicken and Emulsify, especially in Gluten-Free cooking. Guar Gum helps keep particles from settling at the bottom of your Sauce or Soup, and helps to keep Oils from separating. Guar Gum, works best if it is added to the Oil...