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Much of the Skeletal Anatomy of Large Domesticated Livestock, like, cattle, sheep or swine, is similar. All of them have vertebra and most are halved into sides as they are processed. The “T” Shaped bone in steak cuts is one half of a vertebrae of the animal most often an...
Table Cheese: An imprecisely used term to describe a cheese that is generally consumed during a meal as a condiment or accompaniment.
Tablecloth Restaurant: Slang for a full-service restaurant, with tables usually with tablecloths; it offers a variety of foods and some level of formality; also known as white tablecloth restaurant.
Culinary Uses A commonly used method for tempering chocolate by hand; melted chocolate is spread out and stirred on a marble of slab to cool it to the proper temperature.
Tablespoon: A unit of measurement used in cooking to measure volume that is equal to 15 milliliters. Can be abbreviated as tbsp, Tbsp, or T. Nutritional Value USDA
Tagetes: A food additive derived from Aztec marigolds and used as a yellow coloring agent.
Tailgate Party: An outdoor meal serbed from the folded-down rear door or tailgate of a station wagon or the trunk of a car, often before a sporting event.
Tails: The last elements to boil and vaporize during the distillation process.
Culinary Uses Tallow: An animal fat (principally mutton and beef) used as a source of fat in cake mixes, shortening and cooking oils. Low Fat No Low Calorie No
Tandoori: A menu term for foods cooked in a tandoori oven; correctly spelled tandur.
Tang: The unsharpened rear extension of a knife blade that is attached to or embedded in the handle; a full tang runs the entire length of the handle; a three-quarter tang extends partially into the handle, and a rattail tang is a rod that runs down the handle's length.
Tannic Acid: A astringent-tasting food additive used as a flavoring agent and/or adjuvant in processed foods such as baked goods, alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages, candies and meat products; also known as hydrolyzable gallotannin. 2. An astringent acid usually added to most wine to...
Little Dishes of Various Tastes & Textures.
Tarator is the name of a cold Soup made from Cucumber (Aryan Cukes), Yogurt, Dill, Salt, Garlic and Sunflower Oil or Olive Oil. Ground Walnuts are a common addition. Tarator is similar to Cacik (from which Tzatziki was developed) and is popular in the summertime in Albania, Bulgaria,...
Tartare: An imprecisely used term for any dish featuring a raw ingredient.
Tasala: An unglazed clay cooking pot used in Nepal for cooking curries, rice and dried peas and beans.
Teaspoon: A unit of measurement used in cooking to measure volume that is equal 5 milliliters. Can be abbreviated as either t or tsp. Nutritional Value USDA
The Telson is the final segment at the end of the body of a Crustacean. The Telson is not thought of as a true segment because it is not seen in the embryo and it does not carry any appendages. In Shrimps, the Telson is often removed from the Tail, (even Tail-On Shrimp, when Peeling...
Temper: To combine ingredients to acclimate their temperatures with each other. Also to bring ingredients to the same temperature before combining them so as to aid in their mixing or cooking. Typically, Butter should be tempered before mixing with Flour, meaning just that the...
Tenderizer: An additive or substance used to soften and/or break down tough Meat fibers; includes enzymes and acidic Marinades.
There are four typical protein tenderizing methods that help make tougher cuts of meat more tender and easier on the jaw as you chew. Varieties Chemical Tenderizing Acid foods and food enzymes can tenderize by breaking down or Denaturing tougher foods. The drawbacks of chemical...
Tenderloin: A flavorful and very tender muscle that runs through the beef short loin and sirloin primals; it is part of T-bone and porterhouse steaks or can be cut into Chateaubriand, Filet Mignon and Tournedos. Low Fat No Low Calorie No
Eggs have Air Cells which are a pocket of air usually found at large end of the egg between the shell membranes. The air cell is caused by contraction of the egg contents while the egg cools after its been laid. The size of the air cell is one of the determinants for grading commercially...
Culinary Uses Thermometers have guages, which are used to check internal temperatures of meat. Nutritional Value USDA
Purchasing Thermoplastic materials for plastic ovenware can be taken from the freezer to the microwave oven to the table. The thermoplastic category includes a number of special compositions for ovenware, all of them considered lightweight and impact-resistant. Some commonly used thermoplastic...
Culinary Uses Thermoset plastic materials used for plastic ovenware have a high heat resistance, which make them suitable for use from the freezer to the microwave, convection or conventional oven. An example of a thermoset plastic material is fiberglass-reinforced polyester. This type of...
A thicker or more viscous substance added to a liquid to make it thicker. Many more are discussed in Lesson 8: Stocks, Sauces & Soups, Topic 3: Sauces, Exercises 7-13. Varieties Some Thickening Agents are: Corn Starch, Cream, Butter, Rouxs. Culinary Uses Thickeners add...
Thomas Jefferson: America's third president, author of the Declaration of Independence, and America's first serious gourmet; he introduced America to the waffle iron, pasta maker, dumbwaiter, Parmesan, figs, anchovies, Dijon Mustard, tarragon vinegar, vanilla, Olive Oil,...
Culinary Uses Spices and Nuts often benefit from being toasted lightly before use or before being ground. Toasting brings out hidden flavors, Volatile Oils and makes the ingredient crispier for a more pleasant chew or Mouth Feel. When toasting nuts or spices keep an eye on them, they burn...
Tomate Frito which means “Fried Tomato” in Spanish is a form of Tomato Purée, where the Tomatoes have been Simmered or Pan Fried in a Vegetable Oil, preferably Olive Oil and flavored with a bit of Onion and/or Garlic. Tomato Frito is typically employed as a base...
Tony Soprano and his crew use the term “Tomato Gravy,” “Gravy” and “Sunday Gravy” to mean Tomato Sauce, especially those with copious quantities of meat Simmered in them; the type of sauce the Neopolitans would call a Ragù. But in the less...
Tomato Juice is the pulp of the Tomato fruit that has been compressed and strained to the consistency of an orange juice. Tomato Juice is used as a drink and an ingredient. Organic Tomato Juice contains three times as much Lycopene (an important nutrient) as standard Tomato...
Country by Country Tomato Purée can mean different things. Varieties In the U.S. Tomato Purée is a processed food, usually containing just tomatoes (though pre-seasoned products exist). U.S. Tomato Purée is different than Tomato Sauce or Tomato Paste, mostly in...
Culinary Uses Tomato Stock is a classical stock, useful in “Leading Sauces” such as Sauce Espagnole. To learn how to make a Tomato Stock, follow this link Lesson 8: Stocks Sauces & Soups Basics, Topic 2: Stocks, Exercise 8: Tomato Stock. Gluten Free Yes Low...
The Chef's Hat.
Culinary Uses Toss: To flip or shake foods with additional ingredients to combine them.
“Tostatura” is easiest to translate as “Toasting” but it is actually used in Italian to mean both “Roasting” or “Toasting” depending on how it is applied. For example, Italians would use the term Tostatura for Coffee but English-speakers...
A “Tough chew” describes when some edible thing is difficult to chew and swallow. A pleasant or non-tough chew is either brittle, so it easily breaks down to manageable bites, or tender so that it is easily masticated. Fibrous foods, like tough vegetables or tough cuts of...
Culinary Uses Tourne: An oblong-shaped cut for vegetables such as carrots, potatoes or squash that provides a distinctive and consistent appearance to the food item being served. These are referred to as "Turned" vegetables. Nutritional Value USDA
A Trencher is a predecessor of the Plate. Trenchers made from the crusts of stale Bread (usually 4 days old) were commonly used until Chinese porcelain reached the West in the 14th century. Though many Trenchers were cut from round loaves, it was considered far more stylish to cut them...
True Cost: the total cost for the quantity of an ingredient, needed for a recipe. Nutritional Value USDA
Truffle Essence is an Essence (a single flavor stock) made from Truffles. Culinary Uses Smart Kitchen teaches how to make a similar Mushroom Essence in Lesson 8: Stocks, Sauces & Soups Basics, Topic 2: Stocks, Exercise 9: Mushroom Essence. Gluten Free Yes Low...
Truffle Peelings are the shavings of the exterior layer of a whole Truffle. Purchasing Truffle Peelings, sold in jars can be a more economical substitute than whole fresh Truffle or whole canned Truffles. Truffle Peelings are an especially good option if fresh Truffles are out of...
Culinary Uses Trussing means to tie off a product to keep its shape and moisture during cooking. Nutritional Value USDA
Tryophile: A connoisseur and lover of Cheese.
A tuber is a plant organism which stores energy for the parent plant; tubers can also be used for vegetative reproduction by most plant species which form tubers. This separates tubers from roots; roots are capable of taking up energy, but cannot store energy. Many cultures eat tubers,...
Turkeys: There are four classes of Turkeys and they are: fryer, roaster, yearling, and mature. Nutritional Value USDA
Turnspit: The child or animal (usually a dog) who turned a spit by walking a treadmill.
Twice-Baked: An expression used to refer to a product that is baked, then reworked and baked a second time. Nutritional Value USDA