Xanthan Gum
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Xanthan Gum is named, quite literally, after a strain of bacteria called Xanthomomonas campestriswhich is mixed with corn sugar to create a slimy thickening agent similar to corn starch and guar gum.

Culinary Uses

Xanthan Gum is used to Thicken and Emulsify, especially in gluten-free cooking.  It helps keep particles from settling at the bottom of your sauce or soup, as well as to keep oils from separating.  In using xanthan gum, it works best if first added to the oil ingredients in the recipe and mixed well to fully dissolve (ideally done in a blender), before adding in other liquid ingredients.  Similar to its sister product, Guar Gumxanthan gum is a good choice for baked goods, while guar gum works better with cold items such as ice cream, pastry fillings, and puddings. In gluten-free cooking, the two often work well together.

Substitutes

Guar Gum

Nutritional Value USDA
GUMS,SD GUMS (INCL LOCUST BEAN,GUAR)
Amount Per 100g
Calories 332
%Daily Value*
 
0%
Total Fat 0g
0%
Saturated Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
0%
Cholesterol 0mg
5%
Sodium 125mg
0%
Potassium 0mg
25%
Total Carbohydrate 77g
308%
Dietary Fiber 77g
Sugars 0g
Protein 4g
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Gluten Free

Yes

Low Fat

Yes

Low Calorie

Yes